Benefits of quitting tobacco


Alternative Names

Secondhand smoke; Cigarette smoking - quitting; Tobacco cessation; Smoking and smokeless tobacco - quitting; Why you should quit smoking

Information

If you smoke, you should quit. But quitting can be hard. Most people who have quit smoking have tried at least once, without success, in the past. View any past attempts to quit as a learning experience, not a failure.

There are many reasons to quit using tobacco. Long-term use of tobacco can increase your risk of many serious health problems.

THE BENEFITS OF QUITTING

You may enjoy the following when you quit smoking.

HEALTH BENEFITS

Some health benefits begin almost immediately. Every week, month, and year without tobacco further improves your health.

Other health benefits of quitting smoking include:

Infants and children who you live with will have:

MAKING THE DECISION

Like any addiction, quitting tobacco is difficult, especially if you do it alone. There are a lot of ways to quit smoking and many resources to help you. Talk to your health care provider about nicotine replacement therapy and smoking cessation medications.

If you join smoking cessation programs, you have a much better chance of success. Such programs are offered by hospitals, health departments, community centers, and work sites.

References

American Cancer Society. When smokers quit - what are the benefits over time?  www.cancer.org/healthy/stayawayfromtobacco/guidetoquittingsmoking/guide-to-quitting-smoking-benefits. Last revised 02/06/2014. Accessed 1/29/2016.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Quitting smoking. Updated May 21, 2015. www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/cessation/quitting/. Accessed February 7, 2016.

George TP. Nicotine and tobacco. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 32.

Patnode CD, O'Connor E, Whitlock EP, et al. Primary care-relevant interventions for tobacco use prevention and cessation in children and adolescents: a systematic evidence review for the US Preventive Services Task Force. Ann Intern Med. 2013;158(4):253-260. PMID: 23229625 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23229625.

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