Elbow pain


Definition

This article describes aching or other discomfort in the elbow that is not related to direct injury.

Alternative Names

Pain - elbow

Causes

This EM Should be displayed at the top of the article section "Causes"

Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis. This is inflammation and injury to the tendons, which are soft tissues that attach muscle to bone.

People who play racquet sports are most likely to injure the tendons on the outside of the elbow. This condition is commonly called tennis elbow. Golfers are more likely to injure the tendons on the inside of the elbow.

Other common causes of elbow tendinitis are gardening, playing baseball, using a screwdriver, or overusing your wrist and arm.

Young children commonly develop "nursemaid's elbow," often when someone is pulling on their straightened arm. The bones are stretched apart momentarily and a ligament slips in between. It becomes trapped when the bones try to snap back into place. Children will usually quietly refuse to use the arm, but often cry out when they try to bend or straighten the elbow. This condition is also called an elbow subluxation (a partial dislocation).

Other common causes of elbow pain are:

Home Care

Gently try to move the elbow and increase your range of motion. If this hurts or you cannot move the elbow, call your health care provider.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if:

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

Your provider will examine you and carefully check your elbow. You will be asked questions about your medical history and symptoms such as:

Treatment depends on the cause, but may involve:

References

Chauhan A, Cunningham J, Bhatnagar R, Baratz C, Baratz ME. Elbow diagnosis and decision making. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 62.

Kane SF, Lynch JH, Taylor JC. Evaluation of elbow pain in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2014;89(8):649-657. PMID: 24784124 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24784124.

A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.