Bubble bath soap poisoning


Definition

Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap.

This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poison exposure. If you or someone you are with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

Poisonous Ingredient

Most bubble bath soaps are considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic).

Symptoms

Symptoms of swallowing bubble bath soap are:

Home Care

DO NOT make a person throw up unless poison control or a health care provider tells you to.

If the soap is in the eyes, flush with lots of water for at least 15 minutes.

If the person swallowed the soap, give them water or milk right away, unless a provider tells you not to. DO NOT give anything to drink if the person has symptoms that make it hard to swallow. These include vomiting, convulsions, or a decreased level of alertness.

Before Calling Emergency

Have this information ready:

Poison Control

Your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States. This hotline number will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.

This is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

What to Expect at the Emergency Room

A visit to the emergency room may not be needed.

If care is needed, the provider will measure and monitor the person's vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Symptoms will be treated.

The person may receive:

Outlook (Prognosis)

Since bubble bath soap is fairly nonpoisonous, recovery is very likely.

References

Zosel AE. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 143.

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