Birthmarks - red


Definition

Red birthmarks are skin markings created by blood vessels close to the skin surface. They develop before or shortly after birth.

Alternative Names

Strawberry mark; Vascular skin changes; Angioma cavernosum; Capillary hemangioma; Hemangioma simplex

Causes

This EM Should be displayed at the top of the article section "Causes"

There are 2 main categories of birthmarks:

Hemangiomas are a common type of vascular birthmark. Their cause is unknown. Their color is caused by the growth of blood vessels at the site. Different types of hemangiomas include:

Symptoms

The main symptoms of birthmarks include:

Exams and Tests

A health care provider should examine all birthmarks. Diagnosis is based on how the birthmark looks.

Tests to confirm deeper birthmarks include:

Treatment

Many strawberry hemangiomas, cavernous hemangiomas, and salmon patches are temporary and do not need treatment.

Port wine stains may not need treatment unless they:

Most permanent birthmarks are not treated before a child reaches school age or the birthmark is causing symptoms. Port wine stains on the face are an exception. They should be treated at a young age to prevent emotional and social problems. Laser surgery can be used to treat them.

Concealing cosmetics may hide permanent birthmarks.

Oral or injected cortisone may reduce the size of a hemangioma that is growing quickly and affecting vision or vital organs.

Other treatments for red birthmarks include:

Outlook (Prognosis)

Birthmarks rarely cause problems, other than changes in appearance. Many birthmarks go away on their own by the time a child reaches school age, but some are permanent. The following development patterns are typical for the different types of birthmarks:

Possible Complications

The following complications can occur from birthmarks:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Have your health care provider look at all birthmarks.

Prevention

There is no known way to prevent birthmarks.

References

Habif TP. Vascular tumors and malformations. In: Habif TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 23.

Paller AS, Mancini AJ. Vascular disorders of infancy and childhood. In: Paller AS, Mancini AJ, eds. Hurwitz Clinical Pediatric Dermatology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 12.

Patterson JW. Vascular tumors. In: Patterson JW, ed. Weedon's Skin Pathology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 38.

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