Blood clots


Definition

Blood clots are clumps that occur when blood hardens from a liquid to a solid.

A thrombus or embolus can partly or completely block the flow of blood in a blood vessel.

Alternative Names

Clot; Emboli; Thrombi; Hypercoagulable state

Causes

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Situations in which a blood clot is more likely to form in veins include:

Blood clots are also more likely to form after an injury. People with cancer, obesity, and liver or kidney disease are also prone to blood clots.

A buildup of cholesterol that narrows an artery may change or slow the flow of blood, making it easier for a blood clot or thrombus to form.

Conditions that are passed down through families (inherited) may make you more likely to form abnormal blood clots. Inherited conditions that affect clotting are:

A blood clot may block an artery or vein in the heart, affecting the:

References

Schafer AI. Thrombotic disorders: hypercoagulable states. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 176.

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