Warts


Definition

Warts are small, usually painless growths on the skin. Most of the time they are harmless. They are caused by a virus called human papillomavirus (HPV). There are more than 180 types of HPV viruses. Some types of warts are spread through sex.

Alternative Names

Plane juvenile warts; Periungual warts; Subungual warts; Plantar warts; Verruca; Verrucae planae juveniles; Filiform warts; Verruca vulgaris

Causes

This EM Should be displayed at the top of the article section "Causes"

All warts can spread from one part of your body to another. Warts can spread from person to person by contact, especially sexual contact.

Symptoms

Most warts are raised and have a rough surface. They may be round or oval.

Different types of warts include:

Exams and Tests

Your health care provider will look at your skin to diagnose warts.

You may have a skin biopsy to confirm the wart is not another type of growth, such as skin cancer.

Treatment

Your provider can treat a wart if you do not like how it looks or if it is painful.

DO NOT attempt to remove a wart yourself by burning, cutting, tearing, picking, or by any other method.

MEDICINES

Over-the-counter medicines are available to remove warts. Ask your provider which medicine is right for you.

DO NOT use over-the-counter wart medicines on your face or genitals. Warts in these areas need to be treated by a provider.

To use wart-removal medicine:

OTHER TREATMENTS

Special foot cushions can help ease the pain from plantar warts. You can buy these at drugstores without a prescription. Use socks. Wear shoes with plenty of room. Avoid high heels.

Your provider may need to trim away thick skin or calluses that form over warts on your foot or around nails.

Your provider may recommend the following treatments if your warts do not go away:

Genital warts are treated in a different way than most other warts.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most often, warts are harmless growths that go away on their own within 2 years. Periungual or plantar warts are harder to cure than warts in other places. Warts can come back after treatment, even if they appear to go away. Minor scars can form after warts are removed. 

Infection with certain types of HPV can increase your risk for cancer. Your provider can discuss this with you.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if:

Prevention

To prevent warts:

References

Bonnez W. Papillomaviruses. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 146.

Habif TP. Warts, herpes simplex, and other viral infections. In: Habif TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 12.

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